1st Time Shearing Our Angora Goats

This weekend after getting everything gathered, watching videos online and reading some books, I took the plunge! I sheared one of our Angora Goats! Poplar, our buckling was due to be shorn.  Angoras have to be sheared twice a year or about every 6 months.  We just acquired the Angoras in October/November and Poplar was on a different shearing schedule. So I had to shear him earlier to get him on the same rotation for the fall.  


Angoras fiber is called Mohair.  Mohair is a soft luxurious fiber that is used in higher end clothing. Angora goats come from turkey the same location as Angora Rabbits, however when talking fiber, Rabbits make angora wool, and Angora Goats make mohair. An easy way to remember is that Goats have beards and therefore have (mo)hair.

After watching the videos and seeing that it only takes about 10 - 20 minutes at tops to shear one goat, I was thinking "Wow, this looks easy!".  Going into it with the mindset that my little goat was just going to sit there while I held him where I wanted him and I was just going to run the clippers over him and I would be done in NO time.  

BOY was I ever wrong!  It started with the back cramps! No one and I mean NO ONE should have to be bent over in that position holding 5lb. clippers and have a goat between there legs for more than a couple of mins.  Being a beginner and trying my hardest to not make my goat look like he was thrown into an airplane propeller and shot out the other side. Lets just say it took me 30-40 minutes just to do his belly and legs! It didn't help that I had to stop every 5 - 10 mins to readjust my back and stretch it out! 

I thought it all would get a little easier when I could lay him on his side and finish the job. NOT EVEN CLOSE! Now i had to deal with the wiggling and legs kicking! Don't get me wrong, Poplar was being well behaved for as long as it took.  It just seemed like every move he made was like a flailing motion that would take me just that much longer to over come.  

After an hour and a half of clipping his belly, legs, sides, back and face, we were done! Hopefully the process will be a little quicker the next time since I will have 6 of them to do.  

So now we have some raw mohair available for any spinners out there.  Keep following the blog for more tails of FARM LIFE and how easy it really is....

1st Time Shearing Our Angora Goats

This weekend after getting everything gathered, watching videos online and reading some books, I took the plunge! I sheared one of our Angora Goats! Poplar, our buckling was due to be shorn.  Angoras have to be sheared twice a year or about every 6 months.  We just acquired the Angoras in October/November and Poplar was on a different shearing schedule. So I had to shear him earlier to get him on the same rotation for the fall.  


Angoras fiber is called Mohair.  Mohair is a soft luxurious fiber that is used in higher end clothing. Angora goats come from turkey the same location as Angora Rabbits, however when talking fiber, Rabbits make angora wool, and Angora Goats make mohair. An easy way to remember is that Goats have beards and therefore have (mo)hair.

After watching the videos and seeing that it only takes about 10 - 20 minutes at tops to shear one goat, I was thinking "Wow, this looks easy!".  Going into it with the mindset that my little goat was just going to sit there while I held him where I wanted him and I was just going to run the clippers over him and I would be done in NO time.  

BOY was I ever wrong!  It started with the back cramps! No one and I mean NO ONE should have to be bent over in that position holding 5lb. clippers and have a goat between there legs for more than a couple of mins.  Being a beginner and trying my hardest to not make my goat look like he was thrown into an airplane propeller and shot out the other side. Lets just say it took me 30-40 minutes just to do his belly and legs! It didn't help that I had to stop every 5 - 10 mins to readjust my back and stretch it out! 

I thought it all would get a little easier when I could lay him on his side and finish the job. NOT EVEN CLOSE! Now i had to deal with the wiggling and legs kicking! Don't get me wrong, Poplar was being well behaved for as long as it took.  It just seemed like every move he made was like a flailing motion that would take me just that much longer to over come.  

After an hour and a half of clipping his belly, legs, sides, back and face, we were done! Hopefully the process will be a little quicker the next time since I will have 6 of them to do.  

So now we have some raw mohair available for any spinners out there.  Keep following the blog for more tails of FARM LIFE and how easy it really is....